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Choose Your Champion: Tournament Earth 2020

Choose Your Champion: Tournament Earth 2020

Tournament Earth is here! We want YOU to help us choose our best Earth image.

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Since 1999, NASA Earth Observatory has published 16,000+ images. To celebrate our 20th anniversary and the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, we want you to pick our all-time best image. Each week from March 23 to April 28, you can vote for your favorite images. Readers will narrow the field from 32 nominees down to one champion in a five-round knockout-style tournament.

The nominees are separated into four groups: Past Winners, Home Planet, Land & Ice, and Sea & Sky.

Past Winners

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No, that is not an animation of the death star orbiting Earth. It is the winner of Tournament Earth in 2016– the Dark Side and the Bright Side. The image shows the fully illuminated far side of the Moon that is not visible from Earth. Other contenders in this category are a picture of a volcanic eruption plume, sands and seas in the Bahamas, and lightning seen from the Space Station.

Home Planet

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This picture of the Twin Blue Marbles is the number one seed in our “Home Planet” category, but that doesn’t mean it’s going to take home the crown. It has stiff competition from the iconic photo of Earth rising to an epic total solar eclipse to our Earth at night.

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Land & Ice

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Are you a land lover or ice lover? If you don’t know, you might found out by browsing the beautiful imagery in this category. Vote on scenes from the partially frozen North Caspian Sea (above) to lava flowing in Iceland between the Bardarbunga and Askja volcanoes (below).

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Sea & Sky

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Hurricanes, lightning, and volcanic explosions are just a few of the amazing captures from NASA satellites and astronauts in this category.

The model-based visual above shows an expansive view of the mishmash of particles that dance and swirl through the atmosphere. It shows tropical cyclones, dust storms, and fires spreading tiny particles throughout the atmosphere during one day in August 2018.

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Our satellites also capture the fine mixing of particles and churning of tides in our rivers. The image above shows dissolved organic matter from forests and wetlands that stained the water dark brown near Rupert Bay. A similar process darkens tea.

Learn more about Tournament Earth in the video below.

See all of the images and vote now HERE. 

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